Kit Information :

Scale : 1/25

Grade : N/A

Made by : ITC

Completed : 15th June '08

Boxart : Original '60s art

Boxart

other Information :

Tyrannosaurus Rex Skeleton

T Rex

 

I've been slowly getting into Dinosaur models for the past year or so now and since I began with my Corythosaurus, I've been eyeing off a few various skeleton model kits on the internet. After a bit of researching and scouring the 'net, I found that a few were available. One day a few months back, a quick search on eBay finally found a couple of pre-loved ITC Skeleton kits that were originally released back in the early 1960's. After a small bidding war, I was the proud owner of two kits, a Stegosaurus and, best of all, a Tyrannosaurus.

For a kit that was made nearly 50 years ago, the Tyrannosaurus is a well designed and molded kit. I began building by pulling the built pieces apart and cleaning up each piece. Cleaning involved sanding and shaving off the flash that was left from the molding process. This was the most time consuming step of the entire build.

Each section was pinned to the next as the mating pieces were either broken off or poorly made (and by poorly I mean as soon as there was the slightest side pressure put on the tail or spine, the join broke). Pinning involved drilling small holes on both sections, inserting a small length of brass rod into the hole and glueing with Zap-a-Gap CA Glue.

A few modifications were made to the kit. First off, the pose was altered to represent the current thinking of how the Tyrannosaurus was postured. No longer is it a 'tail dragger' as such, so the legs and head were angled differently to show a much straighter posture, parallel to the ground. The other modification was to drill out the nasal cavity of the skull. This was done with a pin vise, a dremel, and some careful filing and scraping.

Painting was easy for this one. My reference picture for the skeleton was one taken of a Tyrannosaurus known as 'Stan' which is positioned in a similar way and is colored in dark browns and blacks as most fossil skeletons are in museum displays. Once primed, a base coat of Flat Earth was added which was given a second coat with Flat Brown. This gave me the type of base color I wanted before the wash was applied. A gloss coat was applied then an oil paint wash with Burnt Umber was added to show a deeper color in the deeper cracks in the bones.

Finally, the scene of a museum display was made. The stand was put together with styrene and painted in Dark Grey. Red Felt was attached with hot glue to act as a carpeted base for the display. Brass rods were bent into shape in my vise and attached in four spots - under the neck, under each feet and one in the side of the tail. Each rod is fixed with CA Glue at the skeleton, at the stand and at the wooden base. The wooden base was stained with a dark stain applied with a large brush which has given the effect of a polished floorboard look. Last of all, I added some chrome rods and attached chain to the tops for a barrier commonly seen at such displays and an information board, which I knocked up in Photoshop, that contains some basic information and a picture of the real beast compared to an average human.

Overall I really enjoyed this build. It is refreshing to build something so diverse from common model subjects (and a total opposite of what I generally build). Dinosaurs are really starting to grab my interest away from generic Gundam builds that I usually do.

Enjoy!